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Fielding Montgomery

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Graduate Student, Communication

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Research Expertise

Political Communication
Popular Culture
Rhetoric

Cover of book by Fielding Montgomery

Fielding Montgomery is a Communication Ph.D. student in Rhetoric & Political Culture at the University of Maryland. Fielding received his M.A. in Communication at Baylor University. He also received his University Scholars B.A. with concentrations in Communication and Political Science at Baylor. During his Master's work, Fielding gained two years of academic editorial experience.

Fielding's research areas focus on presidential rhetoric and popular culture and where those areas intersect. He has published on these and other topics in academic journal articles, including “The Monstrous Election: Horror Framing in Televised Campaign Advertisements during the 2016 Presidential Election” in Rhetoric & Public Affairs, "Freedom of the Press and Perceptions about Government Corruption" in the International Political Science Review, and "Rogue One: A U.S. Imperialism Story" in the Journal of Popular Film & Television. Fielding is also the author of Horror Framing and the General Election: Ghosts and Ghouls in Twenty-First-Century Presidential Campaign Advertisements, forthcoming from Lexington Books.

Publications

COMM Doctoral Student Authors New Book about Political Ads

Montgomery authors first book on horror framing and the presidential political commercials of the 21st century.

Communication

Lead: Fielding Montgomery
Dates:

In Horror Framing and the General Election: Ghosts and Ghouls in Twenty-First-Century Presidential Campaign Advertisements, UM doctoral student Fielding Montgomery reveals a pattern of mostly increasing horror framing implemented across presidential elections from 2000 to 2020. By analyzing the two most common frameworks of horror within U.S. popular culture (classic and conflicted), he demonstrates how such frameworks are deployed by twenty-first-century U.S. presidential campaign advertisements. Televised advertisements are analyzed to illustrate a clearer picture of how horror frameworks have been utilized, the intensity of their usage, and how self-positive appeals to audience efficacy help bolster these rhetorical attempts at persuasion. Horror Framing and the General Election shows readers how the extensionally constitutive ripples of horrific campaign rhetoric are felt in contemporary political unrest and provides a potential path forward.

Rogue One: A U.S. Imperialism Story

This essay analyzes one of the newest additions to this lineage, Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, and the ways the film moves the original Star Wars from the purely fantastical to the contemporary, political climate.

Communication

Lead: Fielding Montgomery
Dates:
JPFT

Among the most prominent cinematic franchises, the Star Wars universe has shaped popular culture in the United States for over forty years. This essay analyzes one of the newest additions to this lineage, Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, and the ways the film moves the original Star Wars from the purely fantastical to the contemporary, political climate. Given Rogue One's chronological position between the original and prequel Star Wars trilogies, the film acts as a bridge between the two. Rogue One connects the overt politics of the prequel trilogy with the covert, yet still present, politics of the original trilogy. Ultimately, Rogue One mirrors contemporary conflicts and crises in the geopolitical sphere and moves the original Star Wars films into this territory, creating a potential rhetorical crossroad for renewed cultural readings.