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Matthew Salzano

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Graduate Student, Communication

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Research Expertise

Digital Media
Rhetoric

Matthew Salzano (he/him) is a Rhetoric and Political Culture Ph.D. student in the Department of Communication at the University of Maryland. He studies digital media, activism, and sensation. He earned his Bachelor of Arts degrees in communication studies and women’s and gender studies at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma, Washington. At UMD, he has earned a Master of Arts in Communication and a Graduate Certificate in Digital Studies in the Arts and Humanities. 

Matthew teaches courses about public speaking (COMM107), digital media and culture (COMM398), critical thinking (COMM200), public deliberation (TA, HNUH238A), and rhetorical criticism (TA, COMM401). His scholarship has appeared in Women’s Studies in CommunicationCollege Media Review, and The Conversation. He also occasionally finds himself as a Twitter bot-creator, video producer, copy editor, and journalist.  

You can learn more about Matthew’s work at matthewsalzano.com and follow his pop culture rants and baking projects on Twitter @matthew_paul

Publications

Expanding and constraining critical communication pedagogy in the introductory communication course: A critique of assessment rubrics

Study presents an interpretive analysis of the presentational speaking rubrics used in the introductory communication course at 20 institutions in the United States.

Communication

Lead: Drew Ashby-King
Contributor(s): Jeannette Iannacone, Victoria Ledford, Alyson Farzad-Phillips, Matthew Salzano, Lindsey Anderson
Dates:

Rubrics are a commonly used tool to evaluate student work in the introductory communication course. Although rubrics may appear objective, they are continually interpreted by both instructors and students, often reflecting traditional classroom power dynamics. In order to understand how rubrics constrain as well as expand opportunities for the enactment of critical communication pedagogy, we conducted an interpretive analysis of the presentational speaking rubrics used in the introductory communication course at 20 institutions in the United States. In doing so, we identified three levels of rubric context: high, low, and shared. These contexts inform important theoretical and pedagogical implications for the introductory course, as they highlight existing power dynamics, instructor grading practices, and student agency.