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Jeannette Iannacone

Photo of Jeannette Iannacone

Graduate Student, Communication

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Research Expertise

Strategic Communication
Public Relations

Jeannette Iannacone is pursuing her Ph.D. in the Department of Communication, with an emphasis on strategic public relations surrounding refugee and immigration discourse. Her interests include the representation of refugees and refugee policy in the American media, highlighting its effect on American public opinion, and contrasting this representation with first-hand refugee narratives as well as the overall dynamics of media reinforcing public opinion and the consequential influence on policy.

Jeannette obtained a Master of Arts (Honours) in International Relations from the University of St Andrews in 2015.  She has acted as the Director of Public Relations for Grassroot Diplomat since May 2016, which has included co-authoring The Brexit Handbook, a book encompassing the diplomatic consequences and strategies in face of the UK withdrawal from the EU. Additionally, Jeannette has served as an AmeriCorps VISTA for the Campus Compact of Southern New England, acting as a liaison between the Western Massachusetts refugee population, including K-12 students and their families, service providers, and community organizations.

 

Publications

Expanding and constraining critical communication pedagogy in the introductory communication course: A critique of assessment rubrics

Study presents an interpretive analysis of the presentational speaking rubrics used in the introductory communication course at 20 institutions in the United States.

Communication

Lead: Drew Ashby-King
Contributor(s): Jeannette Iannacone, Victoria Ledford, Alyson Farzad-Phillips, Matthew Salzano, Lindsey Anderson
Dates:

Rubrics are a commonly used tool to evaluate student work in the introductory communication course. Although rubrics may appear objective, they are continually interpreted by both instructors and students, often reflecting traditional classroom power dynamics. In order to understand how rubrics constrain as well as expand opportunities for the enactment of critical communication pedagogy, we conducted an interpretive analysis of the presentational speaking rubrics used in the introductory communication course at 20 institutions in the United States. In doing so, we identified three levels of rubric context: high, low, and shared. These contexts inform important theoretical and pedagogical implications for the introductory course, as they highlight existing power dynamics, instructor grading practices, and student agency.